Why not build #OpenJDK 9 using #Docker ? – Part 2 of 2

…continuing from Why not build #OpenJDK 9 using #Docker ? – Part 1 of 2.

I ran into a number of issues and you can see from my commits, I pulled myself out of it, but to run this Dockerfile from the command-line I used this instruction:

$ docker build -t neomatrix369/openjdk9 .

you can also do it using the below if you have not set your permissions:

$ sudo docker build -t neomatrix369/openjdk9 .

and get the below (summarised) output:

Sending build context to Docker daemon 3.072 kB
Sending build context to Docker daemon 
Step 0 : FROM phusion/baseimage:latest
 ---> 5a14c1498ff4
Step 1 : MAINTAINER Mani Sarkar (from @adoptopenjdk)
 ---> Using cache
 ---> 95e30b7f52b9
Step 2 : RUN apt-get update &&   apt-get install -y     libxt-dev zip pkg-config libX11-dev libxext-dev     libxrender-dev libxtst-dev libasound2-dev libcups2-dev libfreetype6-dev &&   rm -rf /var/lib/apt/lists/*
 ---> Using cache
 ---> 1ea3bbb15c2d
Step 3 : RUN apt-get update
 ---> Using cache
 ---> 6c3938f4d23d
Step 4 : RUN apt-get install -y mercurial ca-certificates-java build-essential
 ---> Using cache
 ---> e3f99b5a3bd3
Step 5 : RUN cd /tmp &&   hg clone http://hg.openjdk.java.net/jdk9/jdk9 openjdk9 &&   cd openjdk9 &&   sh ./get_source.sh
 ---> Using cache
 ---> 26cfaf16b9fa
Step 6 : RUN apt-get install -y wget &&   wget --no-check-certificate --header "Cookie: oraclelicense=accept-securebackup-cookie" http://download.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/8u45-b14/jdk-8u45-linux-x64.tar.gz
 ---> Using cache
 ---> 696889250fed
Step 7 : RUN tar zxvf jdk-8u45-linux-x64.tar.gz -C /opt
 ---> Using cache
 ---> c25cc9201c1b
Step 8 : RUN cd /tmp/openjdk9 &&   bash ./configure --with-cacerts-file=/etc/ssl/certs/java/cacerts --with-boot-jdk=/opt/jdk1.8.0_45
 ---> Using cache
 ---> 4e425de379e6
Step 9 : RUN cd /tmp/openjdk9 &&   make clean images
 ---> Using cache
 ---> 2d9e17c870be
Step 10 : RUN cd /tmp/openjdk9 &&   cp -a build/linux-x86_64-normal-server-release/images/jdk     /opt/openjdk9
 ---> Using cache
 ---> 9250fac9b500
Step 11 : RUN cd /tmp/openjdk9 &&   find /opt/openjdk9 -type f -exec chmod a+r {} + &&   find /opt/openjdk9 -type d -exec chmod a+rx {} +
 ---> Using cache
 ---> d0c597d045d4
Step 12 : ENV PATH /opt/openjdk9/bin:$PATH
 ---> Using cache
 ---> 3965c3e47855
Step 13 : ENV JAVA_HOME /opt/openjdk9
 ---> Using cache
 ---> 5877e8efd939
Successfully built 5877e8efd939

The above action creates an image which is stored in your local repository (use docker images to enlist the images in the repo). If you want to load the image into a container, and access the files it has built or see anything else, do the below:

$ sudo docker run -it --name openjdk9 neomatrix369/openjdk9 /bin/bash

this will take you to a bash prompt into the container and you can run any of your linux commands and access the file system.

Explaining docker run

$ sudo docker run -it --name openjdk9 neomatrix369/openjdk9 java -version

will show you this

openjdk version "1.9.0-internal"
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 1.9.0-internal-_2015_06_04_06_46-b00)
OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 1.9.0-internal-_2015_06_04_06_46-b00, mixed mode)

Here’s a breakdown of the docker run command:

docker run The command to create and start a new Docker container.
-it To run in interactive mode, so you can see the after running the container.
neomatrix369/openjdk9 This is a reference to the image tag by name (which we created above).
java -version Runs the java command asking its version, inside the containing, which is assisted by the two environment variables PATH and JAVA_HOME which was set in the Dockerfile above.

Footnotes

You might have noticed I grouped very specific instructions with each step, especially the RUN commands, its because, each time I got one of these wrong, it would re-execute the step again, including the steps that ran fine and didn’t need re-executing. Not only is this unnecessary its not using our resources efficiently which is what Docker brings us. So any addition, edition or deletion to any step will only result in that step being executed, and not the other steps that are fine.

So one of the best practises is to keep the steps granular enough and pre-load files and data beforehand and give it to docker. It has amazing caching and archiving mechanisms built in.

Save our work

As we know if we do not save the container into the image, our changes are lost.

If I didn’t use the docker build command I used earlier I could have, after the build process was completed and image created, used the below command:

$ sudo docker commit [sha of the image] neomatrix369/openjdk9

Sharing your docker image on Docker hub

Once you are happy with your changes, and want to share it with community at large, do the below:

$ sudo docker push neomatrix369/openjdk9

and you will see these depending on which of your layers have been found in the repo and which ones are new (this one is an example snapshot of the process):

The push refers to a repository [neomatrix369/openjdk9] (len: 1)
5877e8efd939: Image already exists 
3965c3e47855: Image already exists 
d0c597d045d4: Image already exists 
9250fac9b500: Image already exists 
2d9e17c870be: Buffering to Disk
.
.
.

There is plenty of room for development and improvement of this Docker script. So happy hacking and would love to hear your feedback or contributions from you.

BIG Thanks

Big thanks to the below two who proof-read my post and added value to it, whilst enjoying the #Software #Craftsmanship developer community (organised and supported by @LSCC):
Oliver Nautsch – @ollispieps (JUG Switzerland)
Amir Bazazi (@Codurance) – @amirbazazi

Special thanks to Roberto Cortez (@radcortez) for your Docker posts, these inspired and helped me write my first Docker post.

Resources

[1] Docker
[2] Get into Docker – A Guide for Total Newbies
[3] Docker for Total Newbies Part 2: Distribute Your Applications with Docker Images
[4] Docker posts on Voxxed
[5] OpenJDK
[6] Building OpenJDK
[7] Building OpenJDK on Linux, MacOs and Windows
[8] Virtual Machines (OpenJDK)
[9] Build your own OpenJDK
[10] Vagrant script (OpenJDK)
[11] YOUR DOCKER IMAGE MIGHT BE BROKEN without you knowing it
[12] Dockerfile on github
[13] Adopt OpenJDK: Getting Started Kit
[14] London Java Community

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Why not build #OpenJDK 9 using #Docker ? – Part 1 of 2

Introduction

I think I have joined the Docker [1] party a bit late but that means by now everyone knows what Docker is and all the other basic fundamentals which I can very well skip, but if you are still interested, please check these posts Get into Docker – A Guide for Total Newbies [2] and Docker for Total Newbies Part 2: Distribute Your Applications with Docker Images [3]. And if you still want to know more about this widely spoken topic, check out these Docker posts on Voxxed [4].

Why ?

Since everyone has been doing some sort of provisioning or spinning up of dev or pre-prod or test environments using Docker [1] I decided to do the same but with my favourite project i.e. OpenJDK [5].

So far you can natively build OpenJDK [6] across Linux, MacOs and Windows [7], or do the same things via virtual machines or vagrant instances, see more on then via these resources Virtual Machines, [8] Build your own OpenJDK [9] and this vagrant script [10]. All part of the Adopt OpenJDK initiative lead by London Java Community [14] and supported by JUGs all over the world.

Requirements

Most parts of post is for those using Linux distributions (this one was created on Ubuntu 14.04). Linux, MacOS and Windows users please refer to Docker‘s  Linux, MacOS and Windows instructions respectively.

Hints: MacOS and Windows users will need to install Boot2Docker and remember to run the below two commands (and check your Docker host environment variables):

$ boot2docker init
$ boot2docker up 
$ boot2docker shellinit 

For the MacOS, if the above throw FATA[…] error messages, please try the below:

$ sudo boot2docker init
$ sudo boot2docker up 
$ sudo boot2docker shellinit 

For rest of the details please refer to the links provided above. Once you have the above in place for the Windows or MacOS platform, by merely executing the Dockerfile using the docker build and docker run commands you can create / update a container and run it respectively.

*** Please refer to the above links and ensure Docker works for you for the above platforms – try out tutorials or steps proving that Docker run as expected before proceeding further. ***

Building OpenJDK 9 using Docker

Now I will show you how to do the same things as mentioned above using Docker.

So I read the first two resource I shared so far (and wrote the last ones). So lets get started, and I’m going to walk you through what the Dockerfile looks like, as I take you through each section of the Dockerfile code.

*** Please note the steps below are not meant to be executed on your command prompty, they form an integral part of the Dockerfile which you can download from here at the end of this post. ***

You have noticed unlike everyone else I have chosen a different OS image i.e. phusion/baseimage, why? Read YOUR DOCKER IMAGE MIGHT BE BROKEN without you knowing it [11], to learn more about it.

FROM phusion/baseimage:latest

Each of the RUN steps below when executed becomes a Docker layer in isolation and gets assigned a SHA like this i.e. 95e30b7f52b9.

RUN \
  apt-get update && \
  apt-get install -y \
    libxt-dev zip pkg-config libX11-dev libxext-dev \
    libxrender-dev libxtst-dev libasound2-dev libcups2-dev libfreetype6-dev && \
  rm -rf /var/lib/apt/lists/*

The base image is updated and a number of dependencies are installed i.e. Mercurial (hg) and build-essential.

RUN \
  apt-get update && \
  apt-get install -y mercurial ca-certificates-java build-essential

Clone the OpenJDK 9 sources and download the latest sources from mercurial. You will notice that each of these steps are prefixed by this line cd /tmp &&, this is because each instruction is run in its own layer, as if it does not remember where it was when the previous instruction was run. Nothing to worry about, all your changes are still intact in the container.

RUN \
  cd /tmp && \
  hg clone http://hg.openjdk.java.net/jdk9/jdk9 openjdk9 && \
  cd openjdk9 && \
  sh ./get_source.sh

Install only what you need when you need them, see below I downloaded wget and then the jdk binary. I also learnt how to use wget by passing the necessary params and headers to make the server give us the binary we request. Finally un-tar the file using the famous tar command.

RUN \
  apt-get install -y wget && \
  wget --no-check-certificate --header "Cookie: oraclelicense=accept-securebackup-cookie" \ 
http://download.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/8u45-b14/jdk-8u45-linux-x64.tar.gz

RUN \
  tar zxvf jdk-8u45-linux-x64.tar.gz -C /opt

Run configure with the famous –with-boot-jdk=/opt/jdk1.8.0_45 to set the bootstrap jdk to point to jdk1.8.0_45.

RUN \
  cd /tmp/openjdk9 && \
  bash ./configure --with-cacerts-file=/etc/ssl/certs/java/cacerts --with-boot-jdk=/opt/jdk1.8.0_45

Now run the most important command:

RUN \  
  cd /tmp/openjdk9 && \
  make clean images

Once the build is successful, the artefacts i.e. jdk and jre images are created in the build folder.

RUN \  
  cd /tmp/openjdk9 && \
  cp -a build/linux-x86_64-normal-server-release/images/jdk \
    /opt/openjdk9

Below are some chmod ceremonies across the files and directories in the openjdk9 folder.

RUN \  
  cd /tmp/openjdk9 && \
  find /opt/openjdk9 -type f -exec chmod a+r {} + && \
  find /opt/openjdk9 -type d -exec chmod a+rx {} +

Two environment variable i.e. PATH and JAVA_HOME are created with the respective values assigned to them.

ENV PATH /opt/openjdk9/bin:$PATH
ENV JAVA_HOME /opt/openjdk9

You can find the entire source for the entire Dockerfile on github [12].

…more of this in the next post, Why not build #OpenJDK 9 using #Docker ? – Part 2 of 2, we will use the docker build, docker run commands and some more docker stuff.

How is Java / JVM built ? Adopt OpenJDK is your answer!

Introduction & history
As some of you may already know, starting with Java 7, OpenJDK is the Reference Implementation (RI) to Java. The below time line gives you an idea about the history of OpenJDK:
OpenJDK history (2006 till date)
If you have wondered about the JDK or JRE binaries that you download from vendors like Oracle, Red Hat, etcetera, then the clue is that these all stem from OpenJDK. Each vendor then adds some extra artefacts that are not open source yet due to security, proprietary or other reasons.


What is OpenJDK made of ?
OpenJDK is made up of a number of repositories, namely corba, hotspot, jaxp, jaxws, jdk, langtools, and nashorn. Between OpenjJDK8 and OpenJDK9 there have been no new repositories introduced, but lots of new changes and restructuring, primarily due to Jigsaw – the modularisation of Java itself [2] [3] [4] [5].
repo composition, language breakdown (metrics are estimated)
Recent history
OpenJDK Build Benchmarks – build-infra (Nov 2011) by Fredrik Öhrström, ex-Oracle, OpenJDK hero!

Fredrik Öhrström visited the LJC [16] in November 2011 where he showed us how to build OpenJDK on the three major platforms, and also distributed a four page leaflet with the benchmarks of the various components and how long they took to build. The new build system and the new makefiles are a result of the build system being re-written (build-infra).


Below are screen-shots of the leaflets, a good reference to compare our journey:

How has Java the language and platform built over the years ?

Java is built by bootstrapping an older (previous) version of Java – i.e. Java is built using Java itself as its building block. Where older components are put together to create a new component which in the next phase becomes the building block. A good example of bootstrapping can be found at Scheme from Scratch [6] or even on Wikipedia [7].


OpenJDK8 [8] is compiled and built using JDK7, similarly OpenJDK9 [9] is compiled and built using JDK8. In theory OpenJDK8 can be compiled using the images created from OpenJDK8, similarly for OpenJDK9 using OpenJDK9. Using a process called bootcycle images – a JDK image of OpenJDK is created and then using the same image, OpenJDK is compiled again, which can be accomplished using a make command option:
$ make bootcycle-images       # Build images twice, second time with newly built JDK

make offers a number of options under OpenJDK8 and OpenJDK9, you can build individual components or modules by naming them, i.e.

$ make [component-name] | [module-name]
or even run multiple build processes in parallel, i.e.
$ make JOBS=<n>                 # Run <n> parallel make jobs
Finally install the built artefact using the install option, i.e.
$ make install


Some myths busted
OpenJDK or Hotspot to be more specific isn’t completely written in C/C++, a good part of the code-base is good ‘ole Java (see the composition figure above). So you don’t have to be a hard-core developer to contribute to OpenJDK. Even the underlying C/C++ code code-base isn’t scary or daunting to look at. For example here is an extract of a code snippet from vm/memory/universe.cpp in the HotSpot repo –
.
.
.
Universe::initialize_heap()

if (UseParallelGC) {
#ifndef SERIALGC
Universe::_collectedHeap = new ParallelScavengeHeap();
#else // SERIALGC
fatal("UseParallelGC not supported in this VM.");
#endif // SERIALGC

} else if (UseG1GC) {
#ifndef SERIALGC
G1CollectorPolicy* g1p = new G1CollectorPolicy();
G1CollectedHeap* g1h = new G1CollectedHeap(g1p);
Universe::_collectedHeap = g1h;
#else // SERIALGC
fatal("UseG1GC not supported in java kernel vm.");
#endif // SERIALGC

} else {
GenCollectorPolicy* gc_policy;

if (UseSerialGC) {
gc_policy = new MarkSweepPolicy();
} else if (UseConcMarkSweepGC) {
#ifndef SERIALGC
if (UseAdaptiveSizePolicy) {
gc_policy = new ASConcurrentMarkSweepPolicy();
} else {
gc_policy = new ConcurrentMarkSweepPolicy();
}
#else // SERIALGC
fatal("UseConcMarkSweepGC not supported in this VM.");
#endif // SERIALGC
} else { // default old generation
gc_policy = new MarkSweepPolicy();
}

Universe::_collectedHeap = new GenCollectedHeap(gc_policy);
}
. . .
(please note that the above code snippet might have changed since published here)
The things that appears clear from the above code-block are, we are looking at how pre-compiler notations are used to create Hotspot code that supports a certain type of GC i.e. Serial GC or Parallel GC. Also the type of GC policy is selected in the above code-block when one or more GC switches are toggled i.e. UseAdaptiveSizePolicy when enabled selects the Asynchronous Concurrent Mark and Sweep policy. In case of either Use Serial GC or Use Concurrent Mark Sweep GC are not selected, then the GC policy selected is Mark and Sweep policy. All of this and more is pretty clearly readable and verbose, and not just nicely formatted code that reads like English.


Further commentary can be found in the section called Deep dive Hotspot stuff in the Adopt OpenJDK Intermediate & Advance experiences [11] document.


Steps to build your own JDK or JRE
Earlier we mentioned about JDK and JRE images – these are no longer only available to the big players in the Java world, you and I can build such images very easily. The steps for the process have been simplified, and for a quick start see the Adopt OpenJDK Getting Started Kit [12] and Adopt OpenJDK Intermediate & Advance experiences [11] documents. For detailed version of the same steps, please see the Adopt OpenJDK home page [13]. Basically building a JDK image from the OpenJDK code-base boils down to the below commands:


(setup steps have been made brief and some commands omitted, see links above for exact steps)
 $ hg clone http://hg.openjdk.java.net/jdk8/jdk8 jdk8  (a)...OpenJDK8
or
$ hg clone http://hg.openjdk.java.net/jdk9/jdk9 jdk9  (a)...OpenJDK9
$ ./get_source.sh                                     (b)
$ bash configure                                      (c)
$ make clean images                                   (d)
(setup steps have been made brief and some commands omitted, see links above for exact steps)


To explain what is happening at each of the steps above:
(a) We clone the openjdk mercurial repo just like we would using git clone ….
(b) Once we have step (a) completed, we change into the folder created, and run the get_source.sh command, which is equivalent to a git fetch or a git pull, since the step (a) only brings down base files and not all of the files and folders.
(c) Here we run a script that checks for and creates the configuration needed to do the compile and build process
(d) Once step (c) is success we perform a complete compile, build and create JDK and JRE images from the built artefacts


As you can see these are dead-easy steps to follow to build an artefact or JDK/JRE images [step (a) needs to be run only once].


Benefits
– contribute to the evolution and improvement of the Java the language & platform
– learn about the internals of the language and platform
– learn about the OS platform and other technologies whilst doing the above
– get involved in F/OSS projects
– stay on top the latest changes in the Java / JVM sphere
– knowledge and experience that helps professionally but also these are not readily available from other sources (i.e. books, training, work-experience, university courses, etcetera).
– advancement in career
– personal development (soft skills and networking)


Contribute
Join the Adopt OpenJDK [13] and Betterrev [15] projects and contribute by giving us feedback about everything Java including these projects. Join the Adoption Discuss mailing list [14] and other OpenJDK related mailing lists to start with, these will keep you updated with latest progress and changes to OpenJDK. Fork any of the projects you see and submit changes via pull-requests.


Thanks and support

Adopt OpenJDK [13] and umbrella projects have been supported and progressed with help of JCP [21], the Openjdk team [22], JUGs like London Java Community [16], SouJava [17] and other JUGs in Brazil, a number of JUGs in Europe i.e. BGJUG (Bulgarian JUG) [18], BeJUG (Belgium JUG) [19], Macedonian JUG [20], and a number of other small JUGs. We hope in the coming time more JUGs and individuals would get involved. If you or your JUG wish to participate please get in touch.

—-

Credits
Special thanks to +Martijn Verburg (incepted Adopt OpenJDK),+Richard Warburton, +Oleg Shelajev, +Mite Mitreski, +Kaushik Chaubal and +Julius G for helping improve the content and quality of this post, and sharing their OpenJDK experience with us.

—-

How to get started ?
Join the Adoption Discuss mailing list [14], go to the Adopt OpenJDK home page [13] to get started, followed by referring to the Adopt OpenJDK Getting Started Kit [12] and Adopt OpenJDK Intermediate & Advance experiences [11] documents.


Please share your comments here or tweet at @theNeomatrix369.

Resources
[17] SouJava

This post is part of the Java Advent Calendar and is licensed under the Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution license. If you like it, please spread the word by sharing, tweeting, FB, G+ and so on!

(Part 3 of 3): Synopsis of articles & videos on Performance tuning, JVM, GC in Java, Mechanical Sympathy, et al

This is a continuation of the previous post titled (Part 2 of 3): Synopsis of articles & videos on Performance tuning, JVM, GC in Java, Mechanical Sympathy, et al.

In our first review, The Atlassian guide to GC tuning is an extensive post covering the methodology and things to keep in mind when tuning GC, practical examples are given and references to important resources are also made in the process. The next one How NOT to measure latency by Gil Tene, he discusses some common pitfalls encountered in measuring and characterizing latency, demonstrating and discussing some false assumptions and measurement techniques that lead to dramatically incorrect reporting results, and covers simple ways to sanity check and correct these situations.  Finally Kirk Pepperdine in his post Poorly chosen Java HotSpot Garbage Collection Flags and how to fix them! throws light on some JVM flags – he starts with some 700 flags and boils it down to merely 7 flags. Also cautions you to not just draw conclusions or to take action in a whim but consult and examine – i.e. measure don’t guess!

….read more (reblogged from the Java Advent Calendar)

(Part 2 of 3): Synopsis of articles & videos on Performance tuning, JVM, GC in Java, Mechanical Sympathy, et al

This is a continuation of the previous post titled (Part 1 of 3): Synopsis of articles & videos on Performance tuning, JVM, GC in Java, Mechanical Sympathy, et al.

Without any further ado, lets get started with our next set of blogs and videos, chop…chop…! This time its Martin Thompson’s blog posts and talks. Martin’s first post on Java Garbage collection distilled basically distils the GC process and the underlying components including throwing light on a number of interesting GC flags (-XX:…). In his next talk he does his myth busting shaabang about mechanical sympathy, what people correctly believe in and the misconceptions. In the talk on performance testing, Martin takes its further and fuses Java, OS and the hardware to show how understanding of all these aspects can help write better programs.


Java Garbage Collection Distilled by Martin Thompson

There are too many flags to allow tuning the GC to achieve the throughput and latency your application requires. There’s plenty of documentation on the specifics of the bells and whistles around them but none to guide you through them.

(Part 1 of 3): Synopsis of articles & videos on Performance tuning, JVM, GC in Java, Mechanical Sympathy, et al

I have been contemplating for a number of months about reviewing a cache of articles and videos on topics like Performance tuning, JVM, GC in Java, Mechanical Sympathy, etc… and finally took the time to do it – may be this was the point in my intellectual progress when was I required to do such a thing!

Thanks to Attila-Mihaly for giving me the opportunity to write a post for his yearly newsletter Java Advent Calendar, hence a review on various Java related topics fits the bill! The selection of videos and articles are purely random, and based on the order in which they came to my knowledge. My hidden agenda is to mainly go through them to understand and broaden my own knowledge at the same time share any insight with others along the way….read more (reblogged from the Java Advent Calendar)

DevoxxUK 2013 aware-ne·ces·si·ty !


You are here because you love and care about software and have a passion for Java/JVM and Web technologies! You are familiar with software, smart devices or even robotics and when you see one you want to take it home! – You are an an inhabitant of planet DevoxxUK !

Post a comment at the bottom of the blog, saying what DevoxxUK means to you and why you are part of it, for e.g.:
– You have been to Devoxx conferences before.
– You are a speaker / presenter at DevoxxUK (I’ll add a speaker badge to your message banner)
– You have passion and love for technology and want to share it with other like minded folks
– You are facilitating the DevoxxUK event
– You may even be a sponsor to the event
– Or you can’t make it and sorry about it, but given a chance you would love to come (maybe next year)!
– Or maybe even wanting to say “Hi” and encourage others to participate in the event!

Just post a message similar to one(s) below with your message, your name, your twitter handle, blog link, a link to your photo (if available), or anything relevant you wish to share with the rest of the community – including details enlisted above. Selected shout-outs will appear in the body of the blog, others will remain in the comments section! Shout-outs will be posted and shared with community far and wide!

Shout-outs that stand-out will be highlighted and given focus!

Follow DevoxxUK on twitter at @DevoxxUK.

DevoxxUK Newsletters!
Newsletter #10 (March 19th)
Newsletter #9 (March 13th) ——– Newsletter #8 (March 7th)
Newsletter #7 (February 26th) ——– Newsletter #6 (February 19th)
Newsletter #5 (February 13th) ——– Newsletter #4 (February 5th)
Newsletter #3 (January 29th) ——– Newsletter #2 (January 22nd)
Newsletter #1 (January 8th)

DevoxxUK full schedule is out! —- Get your ticket today!

Adopt OpenJDK and Adopt-a-JSR events and speakers at DevoxxUK 2013 – Bring your Java queries realted to JSRs, the JCP, the OpenJDK, excetera to these events.

Adopt OpenJDK

Adopt-a-JSR

Speakers / Presenters

#DevoxxUK Shout-outs!

BeJUG

Devoxx

Devoxx UK is a great opportunity for the London Java Community (and beyond) to learn, network and get inspired during this event. It’s also a very nice extension to the already sold out Devoxx Belgium and France editions.

Attending a conference by developers for developers (at a very democratic price) can really bring value to your career. Of course the things you learn and pick up but more importantly the peer-to-peer contacts & conversations often inspire you to take your ideas (and even your code) to the next level.

Enjoy our first Devoxx UK edition.

— Stephan Janssen (@Stephan007) * java developer * BeJUG, Devoxx, Parleys and Playpass + Java Champion * Belgium


We are really looking forward to DevoxxUK. Great to get the conference over here and for the LJC to have such a big part in it.

At RecWorks we are always encouraging developers to engage with the community, learn more and get involved in what’s going on. DevoxxUK seems a perfect place to do that and at a price point that is open to everyone. See you at the LJC stand!

— Barry Cranford (@bcrecworks) * Founder, leader, organiser, community herder * London Java Community JUG (LJC JUG): @ljcjug, Graduate Developers Community: @GDCldn, RecWorks: @RecWorks, Samantha Hepburn: @SHRecWorks * London

European Platinum Partners

ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK4
I have been to several Devoxx conferences (in Belgium) and to several other conferences all over Europe as well. I’m even going to be a speaker at Devoxx UK this year. So if you’re interested in creating Word/Excel documents with Java, come to my quickie. I’m also going to be co-host of the Duchess Women in IT BoF and maybe you’ll find me on a panel about teaching kids how to code.
ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK2
— Linda van der Pal (@DuchessFounder) * java developer, leader, speaker * Belgium

ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK4
Needless to say, I’m obviously very excited about Devoxx UK! Devoxx has always been the premier Java conference in Europe and it’s a fantastic opportunity for Londoners to get a piece of that. I’m particularly excited about some of the deep dive and topical talks on Java and Cloud security, and the Hands on Labs for Java EE7 and Java 8 are also major highlights for me. Get your ticket today!

ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK2— Martijn Verburg (@karianna) * The Diabolical Developer, CTO – jClarity, London JUG co-leader (LJC), Speaker, Author, Javaranch Mod, PCGen & Adopt OpenJDK / A-JSR Cat herder, Java Champion, Cat herder 😉 * London


DevoxxUK is going to be my first proper software conference where I’m involved with the top brass (if I may) and their supporters, from world of developers ! The two days of DevoxxUK will be filled with excitement, throwing a lot of attention on technologies that developers are passionate about, that make them proud and that they hold close to their hearts ! Remember it is an event for developers by developers, for the community by the community. In the last so many years, the age range of developers have breached its limits again-and-again – today we have kids (Devoxx 4 Kids) as young as 10 are being introduced to robotics, smart devices and programming. But lets not forget the veterans of the software industry in their 50s and 60s who have left behind system-level and functional languages for us to cherish! DevoxxUK is hosting and welcoming many such inhabitants from a growing and maturing planet of developers and creators of our past, present and future!

— mani (@theNeomatrix369) * blog * #java developer * Agile (TDD, BDD), Bash, full of innovative ideas, thinker, creator! Blogger! LJC & LSCC member. LJC Advocate (@adoptopenjdk and @adoptajsr programs), MutabilityDetector! * london

Silver Partner

My very first software conference was LJC Conf 2012 and ever since then I have been bitten by the bug! Devoxx UK is a fantastic opportunity to learn about all the latest technologies and pick the brains of some of the greatest developers in our industry. I’m extremely excited and I simply can’t wait 😀

ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK2

— Edward Yue Shung Wong (@arkangelofkaos) * passionate java developer * London

Great event!!!! I would like to go there this year!!!


— Emanuel Cordeiro (@emanuelcordeiro) * blog * java developer * CEJUG member * Brazil ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The first time I heard about DevoxxUK was during Devoxx 2012 in Belgium. I’ve got immediately excited! No doubt that it´s going to be a great edition! I will attend on behalf of CEJUG (cejug.org) and my goal, besides attending all those great conference sessions, is to get in touch with AdoptOpenJDK and AdoptaJSR folks! Those guys are doing a great job by moving Java forward! CEJUG Community heavily supports these initiatives!


— Hildeberto Mendonca (@htmfilho) * java developer * CEJUG member * Brazil

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Grande Evento, uma oportunidade para todos aqueles que amam tecnologia! A comunidade CEJUG estará bem representado com Hildeberto. (Great Event, an opportunity for all those who love technology! The CEJUG community will be well represented by Hildeberto.)

— Jardel Rodrigues (@JardelJava) * java developer * CEJUG member * Brazil

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Yes CEJUG has the passion for java / JVM and Web technologies ! Manda Bala DevoxxUK (“Go go go DevoxxUK“) !!!


— Hélio Frota (@hf_metal) * enthusiastic java developer * CEJUG leader * Brazil

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Vamos que vamos porque os cães ladram mas a caravana não para (PH) [“Come on everyone let’s go !”]

— Eduardo Vieira (@dudurct) * sysadmin * CEJUG * Brazil

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É uma excelente oportunidade para a nossa comunidade (CEJUG) absorver um conteúdo tão bem elaborado para a rotina atual e corrida de um desenvolvedor. Desejo que os participantes aproveitem ao máximo o partilhar dos “Caras do desenvolvimento” e estreitem laços entre outros desenvolvedores de uma forma qualitativa e eficaz.
De fato é um evento da comunidade para a comunidade!
Ao infinito… e a Londres! (Rsrs)

It is an excellent opportunity for our community (CEJUG) to absorb content as well prepare for the development of the future of a developer. I wish the participants make the most of the presence of you “developers” and establish closer links between other developers in a qualitative and effective manner.
In fact it is a community event for the community!
To infinity … and London! (Lol)


— Israel Bruno (@ibmarques) * java developer * CEJUG * Brazil


Bronze Partners

I am so exited to know about this great conference, I was looking forward to participate in this year Devoxx UK, but I participated in Devoxx France but I have submitted lately and also for my bad chance it only has a limited slots for English sessions.

This conference gather the top quality speakers, some of them I know well, specially for their high activity and professionalization in JCP as we worked together in adopt-a-JSR program. Mani Sarkar, Somay, Hildeberto Mendonca, Arun Gupta, Adam Bien and Martijn Verburg.

I am looking forward to speak at next year Devoxx UK 2014 😉


— Mohamed Taman (@_tamanm) * systems architect * java team leader * MoroccoJUG * Morocco


ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK4 Being part of Devoxx UK is very important to me. Not every developer works for a company that can afford to send them on expensive overseas or local conferences. And that’s where Devoxx is different, we strongly believe in catering to and the support of the local communities and want to offer a real value for money experience in the heart of London – home to 1000s of developers. Naturally I’m also really excited by the content; it’s one thing to be able to read things in blogs, it’s another to have a dynamic and engaging speaker serve up novel or challenging ideas like a pro at Wimbledon. So make sure you get a ticket and grab a seat in the front row!




— James McGivern (Twitter Id pending!) * mathematician turned programmer, software engineer * London


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ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK2
— xxx (@xxxxx) * yyyy zzzzz * ppppp


====>> Vacant space to be filled by you <<<====
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ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK2
— xxx (@xxxxx) * yyyy zzzzz * ppppp



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