Adopt OpenJDK & Java community: how can you help Java !

Introduction

I want to take the opportunity to show what we have been doing in last year and also what we have done so far as members of the community. Unlike other years I have decided to keep this post less technical compare to the past years and compared to the other posts on Java Advent this year.

inthebeginning

This year marks the fourth year since the first OpenJDK hackday was held in London (supported by LJC and its members) and also when the Adopt OpenJDK program was started. Four years is a small number on the face of 20 years of Java, same goes to the size of the Adopt OpenJDK community which forms a small part of the Java community (9+ million users). Although the post is non-technical in nature, the message herein is fairly important for the future growth and progress of our community and the next generation developers.

Creations of the community

Creations from the community

Over the many months a number of members of our community contributed and passed on their good work to us. In no specific order I have enlisted these picking them from memory. I know there are more to name and you can help us by sharing those with us (we will enlist them here).  So here are some of those that we can talk about and be proud of, and thank those who were involved:

  • Getting Started page – created to enabled two way communication with the members of the community, these include a mailing list, an IRC channel, a weekly newsletter, a twitter handle, among other social media channels and collaboration tools.
  • Adopt OpenJDK project: jitwatch – a great tool created by Chris Newland, its one of its kind, ever growing with features and helping developers fine-tune the performance of your Java/JVM applications running on the JVM.
  • Adopt OpenJDK: GSK – a community effort gathering knowledge and experience from hackday attendees and OpenJDK developers on how to go about with OpenJDK from building it to creating your own version of the JDK. Many JUG members have been involved in the process, and this is now a e-book available in many languages (5 languages + 2 to 3 more languages in progress).
  • Adopt OpenJDK vagrant scripts – a collection of vagrant scripts initially created by John Patrick from the LJC, later improved by the community members by adding more scripts and refactoring existing ones. Theses scripts help build OpenJDK projects in a virtualised container i.e. VirtualBox, making building, and testing OpenJDK and also running and testing Java/JVM applications much easier, reliable and in an isolated environment.
  • Adopt OpenJDK docker scripts – a collection of docker scripts created with the help of the community, this is now also receiving contributions from a number of members like Richard Kolb (SA JUG). Just like the vagrant scripts mentioned above, the docker scripts have similar goals, and need your DevOps foo!
  • Adopt OpenJDK project: mjprof – mjprof is a Monadic jstack analysis tool set. It is a fancy way to say it analyzes jstack output using a series of simple composable building blocks (monads). Many thanks to Haim Yadid for donating it to the community.
  • Adopt OpenJDK project: jcountdown – built by the community that mimics the spirit of ie6countdown.net. That is, to encourage users to move to the latest and greatest Java! Many thanks to all those involved, you can already see from the commit history.
  • Adopt OpenJDK CloudBees Build Farm – thanks to the folks at CloudBees for helping us host our build farm on their CI/CD servers. This one was initially started by Martijn Verburg and later with the help of a number of JUG members have come to the point that major Java projects are built against different versions of the JDK. These projects include building the JDKs themselves (versions 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, Jigsaw and Shenandoah). This project has also helped support the Testing Java Early project and Quality  Outreach program.

These are just a handful of such creations and contributions from the members of the community, some of these projects would certainly need help from you. As a community one more thing we could do well is celebrate our victories and successes, and especially credit those that have been involved whether as individuals or a community. So that our next generation contributors feel inspired and encourage to do more good work and share it with us.

Contributions from the community

contribution_header-700x325In a recent tweet and posts to various Java / JVM and developer mailing lists, I requested the community to come forward and share their contribution stories or those from others with our community. The purpose was two-fold, one to share it with the community and the other to write this post (which in turn is shared with the community). I was happy to see a handful of messages sent to me and the mailing lists by a number of community members. I’ll share some of these with you (in the order I have received them).

 

Sebastian Daschner:

I don’t know if that counts as contribution but I’ve hacked on the
OpenJDK compiler for fun several times. For example I added a new
thought up ‘maybe’ keyword which produces randomly executed code:
https://blog.sebastian-daschner.com/entries/maybe_keyword_in_java

Thomas Modeneis:

Thanks for writing, I like your initiative, its really good to show how people are doing and what they have been focusing on. Great idea.
From my part, I can tell about the DevoxxMA last month, I did a talk on the Hacker Space about the Adopt the OpenJDK and it was really great. We had about 30 or more attendees, it was in a open space so everyone that was going to any talk was passing and being grabbed to have a look about the topic, it was really challenging because I had no mic. but I managed to speak out loud and be listen, and I got great feedback after the session. I’m going to work over the weekend to upload the presentation and the recorded video and I will be posting here as soon as I have it done! :)

Martijn Verburg:

Good initiative.  So the major items I participated in were Date and Time and Lambdas Hackdays (reporting several bugs), submitted some warnings cleanups for OpenJDK.  Gave ~10 pages of feedback for jshell and generally tried to encourage people more capable than me to contribute :-).

Andrii Rodionov:

Olena Syrota and Oleg Tsal-Tsalko from Ukraine JUG: Contributing to JSR 367 test code-base (https://github.com/olegts/jsonb-spec), promoting ‘Adopt a JSR’ and JSON-B spec at JUG UA meetings (http://jug.ua/2015/04/json-binding/) and also at JavaDay Lviv conference (http://www.slideshare.net/olegtsaltsalko9/jsonb-spec).

Contributors

contributorAs you have seen that from out of a community of 9+ million users, only a handful of them came forward to share their stories. While I can point you out to another list of contributors who have been paramount with their contributions to the Adopt OpenJDK GitBook, for example, take a look at the list of contributors and also the committers on the git-repo. They have not just contributed to the book but to Java and the OpenJDK community, especially those who have helped translate the book into multiple languages. And then there are a number of them who haven’t come forward to add their names to the list, even though they have made valuable contributions.

From this I can say contributors can be like unsung heroes, either due their shy or low-profile nature or they just don’t get noticed by us. So it would only be fair to encourage them to come forward or share with the community about their contributions, however simple or small those may be. In addition to the above list I would like to also add a number of them (again apologies if I have missed out your name or not mentioned about you or all your contributions). These names are in no particular order but as they come to my mind as their contributions have been invaluable:

  • Dalibor Topic (OpenJDK Project Lead) & the OpenJDK team
  • Mario Torre & the RedHat OpenJDK team
  • Tori Wieldt (Java Community manager) and her team
  • Heather Vancura & the JCP team
  • NightHacking, vJUG and RebelLabs (and the great people behind them)
  • Nicolaas & the team at Cloudbees
  • Chris Newland (JitWatch developer)
  • Lucy Carey, Ellie & Mark Hazell (Devoxx UK & Voxxed)
  • Richard Kolb (JUG South Africa)
  • Daniel Bryant, Richard Warburton, Ben Evans, and a number of others from LJC
  • Members of SouJava (Otavio, Thomas, Bruno, and others)
  • Members of Bulgarian JUG (Ivan, Martin, Mitri) and neighbours
  • Oti, Ludovic & Patrick Reinhart
  • and a number of other contributors who for some reason I can’t remember…

I have named them for their contributions to the community by helping organise Hackdays during the week and weekends, workshops and hands-on sessions at conferences, giving lightening talks, speaking at conferences, allowing us to host our CI and build farm servers, travelling to different parts of the world holding the Java community flag, writing books, giving Java and advance-level training, giving feedback on new technologies and features, and innumerable other activities that support and push forward the Java / JVM platform.

How you can make a difference ? And why ?

make_a_differenceYou can make a difference by doing something as simple as clicking the like button (on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, etc…) or responding to a message on a mailing list by expressing your opinion about something you see or read about –as to why you think about it that way or how it could be different.

The answer to the question “And why ?” is simple, because you are part of a community and ‘you care’ and want to share your knowledge and experience with others — just like the others above who have spared free moments of their valuable time for us.

Is it hard to do it ? Where to start ? What needs most attention ?

important-checklist The answer is its not hard to do it, if so many have done it, you can do it as well. Where to start and what can you do ? I have written a page on this topic. And its worth reading it before going any further.

There is a dynamic list of topics that is worth considering when thinking of contributing to OpenJDK and Java. But recently I have filtered this list down to a few topics (in order of precedence):

We need you!

With that I would like to close by saying:

i_need_you_duke3

Not just “I”, but we as a community need you

This post have been re-blogged from the Java Advent Calendar 2015 site. Many thanks to its organisers and writers.

This post is part of the Java Advent Calendar and is licensed under the Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution license. If you like it, please spread the word by sharing, tweeting, FB, G+ and so on!

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How is Java / JVM built ? Adopt OpenJDK is your answer!

Introduction & history
As some of you may already know, starting with Java 7, OpenJDK is the Reference Implementation (RI) to Java. The below time line gives you an idea about the history of OpenJDK:
OpenJDK history (2006 till date)
If you have wondered about the JDK or JRE binaries that you download from vendors like Oracle, Red Hat, etcetera, then the clue is that these all stem from OpenJDK. Each vendor then adds some extra artefacts that are not open source yet due to security, proprietary or other reasons.


What is OpenJDK made of ?
OpenJDK is made up of a number of repositories, namely corba, hotspot, jaxp, jaxws, jdk, langtools, and nashorn. Between OpenjJDK8 and OpenJDK9 there have been no new repositories introduced, but lots of new changes and restructuring, primarily due to Jigsaw – the modularisation of Java itself [2] [3] [4] [5].
repo composition, language breakdown (metrics are estimated)
Recent history
OpenJDK Build Benchmarks – build-infra (Nov 2011) by Fredrik Öhrström, ex-Oracle, OpenJDK hero!

Fredrik Öhrström visited the LJC [16] in November 2011 where he showed us how to build OpenJDK on the three major platforms, and also distributed a four page leaflet with the benchmarks of the various components and how long they took to build. The new build system and the new makefiles are a result of the build system being re-written (build-infra).


Below are screen-shots of the leaflets, a good reference to compare our journey:

How has Java the language and platform built over the years ?

Java is built by bootstrapping an older (previous) version of Java – i.e. Java is built using Java itself as its building block. Where older components are put together to create a new component which in the next phase becomes the building block. A good example of bootstrapping can be found at Scheme from Scratch [6] or even on Wikipedia [7].


OpenJDK8 [8] is compiled and built using JDK7, similarly OpenJDK9 [9] is compiled and built using JDK8. In theory OpenJDK8 can be compiled using the images created from OpenJDK8, similarly for OpenJDK9 using OpenJDK9. Using a process called bootcycle images – a JDK image of OpenJDK is created and then using the same image, OpenJDK is compiled again, which can be accomplished using a make command option:
$ make bootcycle-images       # Build images twice, second time with newly built JDK

make offers a number of options under OpenJDK8 and OpenJDK9, you can build individual components or modules by naming them, i.e.

$ make [component-name] | [module-name]
or even run multiple build processes in parallel, i.e.
$ make JOBS=<n>                 # Run <n> parallel make jobs
Finally install the built artefact using the install option, i.e.
$ make install


Some myths busted
OpenJDK or Hotspot to be more specific isn’t completely written in C/C++, a good part of the code-base is good ‘ole Java (see the composition figure above). So you don’t have to be a hard-core developer to contribute to OpenJDK. Even the underlying C/C++ code code-base isn’t scary or daunting to look at. For example here is an extract of a code snippet from vm/memory/universe.cpp in the HotSpot repo –
.
.
.
Universe::initialize_heap()

if (UseParallelGC) {
#ifndef SERIALGC
Universe::_collectedHeap = new ParallelScavengeHeap();
#else // SERIALGC
fatal("UseParallelGC not supported in this VM.");
#endif // SERIALGC

} else if (UseG1GC) {
#ifndef SERIALGC
G1CollectorPolicy* g1p = new G1CollectorPolicy();
G1CollectedHeap* g1h = new G1CollectedHeap(g1p);
Universe::_collectedHeap = g1h;
#else // SERIALGC
fatal("UseG1GC not supported in java kernel vm.");
#endif // SERIALGC

} else {
GenCollectorPolicy* gc_policy;

if (UseSerialGC) {
gc_policy = new MarkSweepPolicy();
} else if (UseConcMarkSweepGC) {
#ifndef SERIALGC
if (UseAdaptiveSizePolicy) {
gc_policy = new ASConcurrentMarkSweepPolicy();
} else {
gc_policy = new ConcurrentMarkSweepPolicy();
}
#else // SERIALGC
fatal("UseConcMarkSweepGC not supported in this VM.");
#endif // SERIALGC
} else { // default old generation
gc_policy = new MarkSweepPolicy();
}

Universe::_collectedHeap = new GenCollectedHeap(gc_policy);
}
. . .
(please note that the above code snippet might have changed since published here)
The things that appears clear from the above code-block are, we are looking at how pre-compiler notations are used to create Hotspot code that supports a certain type of GC i.e. Serial GC or Parallel GC. Also the type of GC policy is selected in the above code-block when one or more GC switches are toggled i.e. UseAdaptiveSizePolicy when enabled selects the Asynchronous Concurrent Mark and Sweep policy. In case of either Use Serial GC or Use Concurrent Mark Sweep GC are not selected, then the GC policy selected is Mark and Sweep policy. All of this and more is pretty clearly readable and verbose, and not just nicely formatted code that reads like English.


Further commentary can be found in the section called Deep dive Hotspot stuff in the Adopt OpenJDK Intermediate & Advance experiences [11] document.


Steps to build your own JDK or JRE
Earlier we mentioned about JDK and JRE images – these are no longer only available to the big players in the Java world, you and I can build such images very easily. The steps for the process have been simplified, and for a quick start see the Adopt OpenJDK Getting Started Kit [12] and Adopt OpenJDK Intermediate & Advance experiences [11] documents. For detailed version of the same steps, please see the Adopt OpenJDK home page [13]. Basically building a JDK image from the OpenJDK code-base boils down to the below commands:


(setup steps have been made brief and some commands omitted, see links above for exact steps)
 $ hg clone http://hg.openjdk.java.net/jdk8/jdk8 jdk8  (a)...OpenJDK8
or
$ hg clone http://hg.openjdk.java.net/jdk9/jdk9 jdk9  (a)...OpenJDK9
$ ./get_source.sh                                     (b)
$ bash configure                                      (c)
$ make clean images                                   (d)
(setup steps have been made brief and some commands omitted, see links above for exact steps)


To explain what is happening at each of the steps above:
(a) We clone the openjdk mercurial repo just like we would using git clone ….
(b) Once we have step (a) completed, we change into the folder created, and run the get_source.sh command, which is equivalent to a git fetch or a git pull, since the step (a) only brings down base files and not all of the files and folders.
(c) Here we run a script that checks for and creates the configuration needed to do the compile and build process
(d) Once step (c) is success we perform a complete compile, build and create JDK and JRE images from the built artefacts


As you can see these are dead-easy steps to follow to build an artefact or JDK/JRE images [step (a) needs to be run only once].


Benefits
– contribute to the evolution and improvement of the Java the language & platform
– learn about the internals of the language and platform
– learn about the OS platform and other technologies whilst doing the above
– get involved in F/OSS projects
– stay on top the latest changes in the Java / JVM sphere
– knowledge and experience that helps professionally but also these are not readily available from other sources (i.e. books, training, work-experience, university courses, etcetera).
– advancement in career
– personal development (soft skills and networking)


Contribute
Join the Adopt OpenJDK [13] and Betterrev [15] projects and contribute by giving us feedback about everything Java including these projects. Join the Adoption Discuss mailing list [14] and other OpenJDK related mailing lists to start with, these will keep you updated with latest progress and changes to OpenJDK. Fork any of the projects you see and submit changes via pull-requests.


Thanks and support

Adopt OpenJDK [13] and umbrella projects have been supported and progressed with help of JCP [21], the Openjdk team [22], JUGs like London Java Community [16], SouJava [17] and other JUGs in Brazil, a number of JUGs in Europe i.e. BGJUG (Bulgarian JUG) [18], BeJUG (Belgium JUG) [19], Macedonian JUG [20], and a number of other small JUGs. We hope in the coming time more JUGs and individuals would get involved. If you or your JUG wish to participate please get in touch.

—-

Credits
Special thanks to +Martijn Verburg (incepted Adopt OpenJDK),+Richard Warburton, +Oleg Shelajev, +Mite Mitreski, +Kaushik Chaubal and +Julius G for helping improve the content and quality of this post, and sharing their OpenJDK experience with us.

—-

How to get started ?
Join the Adoption Discuss mailing list [14], go to the Adopt OpenJDK home page [13] to get started, followed by referring to the Adopt OpenJDK Getting Started Kit [12] and Adopt OpenJDK Intermediate & Advance experiences [11] documents.


Please share your comments here or tweet at @theNeomatrix369.

Resources
[17] SouJava

This post is part of the Java Advent Calendar and is licensed under the Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution license. If you like it, please spread the word by sharing, tweeting, FB, G+ and so on!

DevoxxUK 2013 aware-ne·ces·si·ty !


You are here because you love and care about software and have a passion for Java/JVM and Web technologies! You are familiar with software, smart devices or even robotics and when you see one you want to take it home! – You are an an inhabitant of planet DevoxxUK !

Post a comment at the bottom of the blog, saying what DevoxxUK means to you and why you are part of it, for e.g.:
– You have been to Devoxx conferences before.
– You are a speaker / presenter at DevoxxUK (I’ll add a speaker badge to your message banner)
– You have passion and love for technology and want to share it with other like minded folks
– You are facilitating the DevoxxUK event
– You may even be a sponsor to the event
– Or you can’t make it and sorry about it, but given a chance you would love to come (maybe next year)!
– Or maybe even wanting to say “Hi” and encourage others to participate in the event!

Just post a message similar to one(s) below with your message, your name, your twitter handle, blog link, a link to your photo (if available), or anything relevant you wish to share with the rest of the community – including details enlisted above. Selected shout-outs will appear in the body of the blog, others will remain in the comments section! Shout-outs will be posted and shared with community far and wide!

Shout-outs that stand-out will be highlighted and given focus!

Follow DevoxxUK on twitter at @DevoxxUK.

DevoxxUK Newsletters!
Newsletter #10 (March 19th)
Newsletter #9 (March 13th) ——– Newsletter #8 (March 7th)
Newsletter #7 (February 26th) ——– Newsletter #6 (February 19th)
Newsletter #5 (February 13th) ——– Newsletter #4 (February 5th)
Newsletter #3 (January 29th) ——– Newsletter #2 (January 22nd)
Newsletter #1 (January 8th)

DevoxxUK full schedule is out! —- Get your ticket today!

Adopt OpenJDK and Adopt-a-JSR events and speakers at DevoxxUK 2013 – Bring your Java queries realted to JSRs, the JCP, the OpenJDK, excetera to these events.

Adopt OpenJDK

Adopt-a-JSR

Speakers / Presenters

#DevoxxUK Shout-outs!

BeJUG

Devoxx

Devoxx UK is a great opportunity for the London Java Community (and beyond) to learn, network and get inspired during this event. It’s also a very nice extension to the already sold out Devoxx Belgium and France editions.

Attending a conference by developers for developers (at a very democratic price) can really bring value to your career. Of course the things you learn and pick up but more importantly the peer-to-peer contacts & conversations often inspire you to take your ideas (and even your code) to the next level.

Enjoy our first Devoxx UK edition.

— Stephan Janssen (@Stephan007) * java developer * BeJUG, Devoxx, Parleys and Playpass + Java Champion * Belgium


We are really looking forward to DevoxxUK. Great to get the conference over here and for the LJC to have such a big part in it.

At RecWorks we are always encouraging developers to engage with the community, learn more and get involved in what’s going on. DevoxxUK seems a perfect place to do that and at a price point that is open to everyone. See you at the LJC stand!

— Barry Cranford (@bcrecworks) * Founder, leader, organiser, community herder * London Java Community JUG (LJC JUG): @ljcjug, Graduate Developers Community: @GDCldn, RecWorks: @RecWorks, Samantha Hepburn: @SHRecWorks * London

European Platinum Partners

ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK4
I have been to several Devoxx conferences (in Belgium) and to several other conferences all over Europe as well. I’m even going to be a speaker at Devoxx UK this year. So if you’re interested in creating Word/Excel documents with Java, come to my quickie. I’m also going to be co-host of the Duchess Women in IT BoF and maybe you’ll find me on a panel about teaching kids how to code.
ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK2
— Linda van der Pal (@DuchessFounder) * java developer, leader, speaker * Belgium

ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK4
Needless to say, I’m obviously very excited about Devoxx UK! Devoxx has always been the premier Java conference in Europe and it’s a fantastic opportunity for Londoners to get a piece of that. I’m particularly excited about some of the deep dive and topical talks on Java and Cloud security, and the Hands on Labs for Java EE7 and Java 8 are also major highlights for me. Get your ticket today!

ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK2— Martijn Verburg (@karianna) * The Diabolical Developer, CTO – jClarity, London JUG co-leader (LJC), Speaker, Author, Javaranch Mod, PCGen & Adopt OpenJDK / A-JSR Cat herder, Java Champion, Cat herder 😉 * London


DevoxxUK is going to be my first proper software conference where I’m involved with the top brass (if I may) and their supporters, from world of developers ! The two days of DevoxxUK will be filled with excitement, throwing a lot of attention on technologies that developers are passionate about, that make them proud and that they hold close to their hearts ! Remember it is an event for developers by developers, for the community by the community. In the last so many years, the age range of developers have breached its limits again-and-again – today we have kids (Devoxx 4 Kids) as young as 10 are being introduced to robotics, smart devices and programming. But lets not forget the veterans of the software industry in their 50s and 60s who have left behind system-level and functional languages for us to cherish! DevoxxUK is hosting and welcoming many such inhabitants from a growing and maturing planet of developers and creators of our past, present and future!

— mani (@theNeomatrix369) * blog * #java developer * Agile (TDD, BDD), Bash, full of innovative ideas, thinker, creator! Blogger! LJC & LSCC member. LJC Advocate (@adoptopenjdk and @adoptajsr programs), MutabilityDetector! * london

Silver Partner

My very first software conference was LJC Conf 2012 and ever since then I have been bitten by the bug! Devoxx UK is a fantastic opportunity to learn about all the latest technologies and pick the brains of some of the greatest developers in our industry. I’m extremely excited and I simply can’t wait 😀

ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK2

— Edward Yue Shung Wong (@arkangelofkaos) * passionate java developer * London

Great event!!!! I would like to go there this year!!!


— Emanuel Cordeiro (@emanuelcordeiro) * blog * java developer * CEJUG member * Brazil ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The first time I heard about DevoxxUK was during Devoxx 2012 in Belgium. I’ve got immediately excited! No doubt that it´s going to be a great edition! I will attend on behalf of CEJUG (cejug.org) and my goal, besides attending all those great conference sessions, is to get in touch with AdoptOpenJDK and AdoptaJSR folks! Those guys are doing a great job by moving Java forward! CEJUG Community heavily supports these initiatives!


— Hildeberto Mendonca (@htmfilho) * java developer * CEJUG member * Brazil

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Grande Evento, uma oportunidade para todos aqueles que amam tecnologia! A comunidade CEJUG estará bem representado com Hildeberto. (Great Event, an opportunity for all those who love technology! The CEJUG community will be well represented by Hildeberto.)

— Jardel Rodrigues (@JardelJava) * java developer * CEJUG member * Brazil

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Yes CEJUG has the passion for java / JVM and Web technologies ! Manda Bala DevoxxUK (“Go go go DevoxxUK“) !!!


— Hélio Frota (@hf_metal) * enthusiastic java developer * CEJUG leader * Brazil

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Vamos que vamos porque os cães ladram mas a caravana não para (PH) [“Come on everyone let’s go !”]

— Eduardo Vieira (@dudurct) * sysadmin * CEJUG * Brazil

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

É uma excelente oportunidade para a nossa comunidade (CEJUG) absorver um conteúdo tão bem elaborado para a rotina atual e corrida de um desenvolvedor. Desejo que os participantes aproveitem ao máximo o partilhar dos “Caras do desenvolvimento” e estreitem laços entre outros desenvolvedores de uma forma qualitativa e eficaz.
De fato é um evento da comunidade para a comunidade!
Ao infinito… e a Londres! (Rsrs)

It is an excellent opportunity for our community (CEJUG) to absorb content as well prepare for the development of the future of a developer. I wish the participants make the most of the presence of you “developers” and establish closer links between other developers in a qualitative and effective manner.
In fact it is a community event for the community!
To infinity … and London! (Lol)


— Israel Bruno (@ibmarques) * java developer * CEJUG * Brazil


Bronze Partners

I am so exited to know about this great conference, I was looking forward to participate in this year Devoxx UK, but I participated in Devoxx France but I have submitted lately and also for my bad chance it only has a limited slots for English sessions.

This conference gather the top quality speakers, some of them I know well, specially for their high activity and professionalization in JCP as we worked together in adopt-a-JSR program. Mani Sarkar, Somay, Hildeberto Mendonca, Arun Gupta, Adam Bien and Martijn Verburg.

I am looking forward to speak at next year Devoxx UK 2014 😉


— Mohamed Taman (@_tamanm) * systems architect * java team leader * MoroccoJUG * Morocco


ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK4 Being part of Devoxx UK is very important to me. Not every developer works for a company that can afford to send them on expensive overseas or local conferences. And that’s where Devoxx is different, we strongly believe in catering to and the support of the local communities and want to offer a real value for money experience in the heart of London – home to 1000s of developers. Naturally I’m also really excited by the content; it’s one thing to be able to read things in blogs, it’s another to have a dynamic and engaging speaker serve up novel or challenging ideas like a pro at Wimbledon. So make sure you get a ticket and grab a seat in the front row!




— James McGivern (Twitter Id pending!) * mathematician turned programmer, software engineer * London


====>> Vacant space to be filled by you <<<====
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx!

ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK2
— xxx (@xxxxx) * yyyy zzzzz * ppppp


====>> Vacant space to be filled by you <<<====
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx!

ImSpeakingAtDevoxxUK2
— xxx (@xxxxx) * yyyy zzzzz * ppppp



Starters

       
         
   

 

– Devoxx Party Sponsors –

    

 

Post #fosdem, #jfokus – lots more #java, #jsr & #openjdk news from all over!

In the last couple of weeks since FOSDEM 2013, Jfokus 2013 and, events and hackdays organised by LJC JUG members, we have had a lots of exciting news and resources to share with you. The source of the information have been mailing lists / forums, meetup events, twitter and other sources.

Plenty were spoken about #java, #jsr and #openjdk, the topics covered by the #adoptajar and #adoptopenjdk programs.

FOSDEM 2013

Speaker interviews:


Jfokus 2013

#Jfokus coverage of #java, a snapshot by Kevin Farnham:


@steveonjava – Nighthacking!

Watch all the recordings of Steve’s Nighthacking from FOSDEM 2013 through to Jfokus 2013!


LJC events & hackdays

Garbage collection – The useful parts


WebSocket & JSON Hack Day (covering implementation for JSR 356 & JSR 353)


Bring your Performance Problems Panel


@adoptajsr news feed

– Plenty of updates on polls, JSRs, presentations, github projects, etc… were discussed on twitter.
– WebSocket & JSON Hack Day (covering implementation for JSR 356 & JSR 353) – see above!
Suggestion to extend / improve the Java API – Thanks Hildeberto Mendonça for coming forward to contribute!
– Modernize Connector/MDB — Vote and comment – Thanks Richard Kolb for support such initiatives!
CDI 1.1 applications you can work with – Thanks Luigi for the contribution!


@adoptopenjdk news feed

– Updates on latest changes and developments in the OpenJDK world that were discussed amongs members on twitter.
– Potential plans to deprecate SPARC V8 support in HotSpot!
– StringBuffer to StringBuilder again – discussions rekindled!


Upcoming events and meetings

Adopt-a-JSR online meeting – February 27
Further hackdays, discussion panels and events to be organised by LJC JUG members.
26-27 March 2013, Devoxx UK

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Read about the Adopt OpenJDK program at the the Adopt OpenJDK java.net project website.
Join the Adopt OpenJDK mailing list at the google group. Find out how to join a Google group or send an email to adopt-openjdk@googlegroups.com to subscribe to the mailing list.

Read about the Adopt-a-JSR program at the java.net project website.
Join the Adopt-a-JSR mailing list at the java.net mailing list. Send an email to members@adoptajsr.java.net to subscribe to the mailing list.

The OpenJDK and JSR topics get good coverage at FOSDEM 2013! JUG members participating!

Its FOSDEM (Free and Open source Software Developers’ European Meeting) time again, and this year we have very good coverage on the OpenJDK and JSR topics at FOSDEM 2013. A number of speakers and events are taking place throughout the two days covering various topics on Java.

Adopt-a-JSR and JSRs
The speakers and events for these topics will speak on the present state and the future of Java, technical topics like InvokeDynamics, Zero, and the Shark compiler. The new JSR for Hotspot/JVM that will affect the Android world i.e. Dalvik users! Below are a list of speakers and events covered under this topic.

Speakers

Events

Adopt OpenJDK / OpenJDK
The OpenJDK topic has got massive coverage with 17 speakers, speaking and holding events covering various topics. In summary the topics covered will be:

– Past and future of OpenJDK, new releases
– Q & A session on OpenJDK
– The OpenJDK journey and what has been learnt so far
– Porting OpenJDK to PowerPC/AIX, AArch64
– Running Nashorn and JavaJFX
– OpenJDK7u progress
– Highlight on OpenJDK Lambda
– Using Shark again

Below are a list of speakers and events covered under this topic.
Speakers

Events

Java gets its own space in the Free Java (Dev Room).

Members of the LJC JUG, CEJUG, Brussels JUG and other JUGs worldwide will be present at this event!

Follow the event on Twitter by following the below handles:
@fosdem
@adoptopenjdk
@adoptajsr

FOSDEM website: https://fosdem.org/2013/

Read about the Adopt OpenJDK program at the the Adopt OpenJDK java.net project website.
Join the Adopt OpenJDK mailing list at the google group or send an email to adopt-openjdk@googlegroups.com to subscribe to the mailing list. Find out how to join a Google group.

Read about the Adopt-a-JSR program at the java.net project website.
Join the Adopt-a-JSR mailing list at the java.net mailing list. Send an email to members@adoptajsr.java.net to subscribe to the mailing list.

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